Mozilla wants to deprecate non-secure HTTP, will make proposals to W3C ‘soon’

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Mozilla today announced its intent to phase out non-secure HTTP. Specifically, the company says it is committed to “new development efforts on the secure web and to start removing capabilities from the non-secure web.”

Richard Barnes, Firefox’s security lead, emphasized the company needs to work with the broader Internet community to achieve this ambitious goal. He outlined Mozilla’s plans as two-fold.

First, Mozilla is hoping to set a date after which all new features will be available only to secure websites. Barnes notes that the community a definition for what features are considered “new” but that’s the general gist.

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[体育]魔术与总经理续约两年 马刺系管理层人人都爱(05/01 05:26)

  北京时间5月1日,奥兰多魔术队官方宣布,球队和总经理罗伯-亨尼根达成续约,亨尼根的合同将延长至2017-18赛季。根据球队的规定,合同的具体细节没有公布。

  “在罗伯(亨尼根)的领导下,我们相信可以建立起一支长期稳定的团队,”魔术CEO阿莱克斯-马丁斯说道,“我们对罗….

Apple’s unfortunate Watch launch — questions still remain

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The more I think about it, the more amazed I am at the way the launch of the Apple Watch has gone down.

It was, in many ways, a botched launch. Consumer interest and demand proved to be very high, but the research suggests that Apple was able to process only about 22 percent of the initial orders and ship the Watches. Everything else was delayed.

This comes on top of the fact that Apple introduced a strange new online-only ordering process for the Watch. There’s no more in-store impulse buying. No magic moment in the store where you say “I have to have that” and then lay down the plastic. No immediate gratification. Instead you wait (and wait) for the notification to finally arrive from Apple saying your product is about to ship.

Many people who ordered on Day 1 (including one of my coworkers) have now received two delay notices from Apple. Some, however, have also received a note saying that the estimated ship date has been moved up. Regardless, most people are having to wait anywhere from a few weeks to a few months, depending on the Watch model they ordered.

The result, I think, is that many people’s first experience with the Apple Watch — and for some, their first experience with smartwatches, full stop — is kind of a bummer.

Is this really the way Apple wanted to introduce people to its first entry to a whole new category of personal technology? I’ll spare you the “planned scarcity” theories, because I doubt they apply here, but it does seem odd that Apple messed this up given all the time it had to prepare for the launch.

Did Apple underestimate the level of demand for the Watch at launch? I doubt it. The company reportedly aims to sell 20 million of the devices in 2015, and we’re already well into the year. If the company anticipated such strong demand for the whole year, how could it have underestimated demand at launch?

“When you have a new product in a new category, there often isn’t industry or benchmarking data available to help estimate the demand,” FusionOps CEO Gary Meyers pointed out. FusionOps makes a cloud-based intelligence platform for managing product launches, including the supply chain.

OK, so maybe underestimating demand could be part of it. But yesterday we heard reports that the delay was related to faulty haptic feedback components — the little bits inside the Watch that buzz your wrist. Apparently the haptic feedback engines (or “Taptic” engines, in Applespeak) produced by one of two Apple suppliers, AAC Technologies Holdings, had to be discarded, so that most of the supply had to be produced by the other supplier.

I understand that these parts suppliers build lots of parts for lots of OEMs, and that they have to set up and tear down manufacturing processes on tight timeframes. But it still seems incredible that the faulty parts would have been discovered so close to launch that it would result in such a serious shortage.

Meyers shed a more positive light on this too: At least Apple arranged to have two suppliers in advance. While he acknowledged that dual sourcing is a common practice, he stressed that it’s less common for brand new inventions like Apple’s Taptic thingy.

I remain skeptical. I don’t think all the facts have come out about what exactly went wrong with the launch. Indeed, the first thing Meyers told me when I spoke to him was that it still isn’t at all clear that the Taptic engine problems were the sole reason for the distribution delays. There may have been other problems we don’t know about yet.

All the facts will surface someday, and it’ll be a good story. There’s a good chance we’ll read all about it on the little screens of our Apple Watches.

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Microsoft now allows developers to create full-blown apps for the Band

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Up until now there has been only one third-party app made for the Microsoft Band fitness tracker — Pimp My Band.

Actually that was a hack, and Microsoft had nothing to do with it. The app allows you to change the background colors on the Band. OK.

Today Microsoft released the full software development kit (SDK) for the Microsoft Health app, the companion app to the Band. So developers can now create legit apps for the Band.

A preview SDK had been available before, but apps created using that could not access all the features and sensors of the Band.

Developers will now be able to create new tiles on the Band’s interface where their apps will live. They’ll be able to create and send notifications to tiles.

They’ll also be able to access the sensors in the Band, which include heart rate, ultraviolet light, accelerometer, gyroscope, and skin temperature.

For example, a developers might use the SDK to create a new custom workout app for the Band. Users might keep track of their stats in Microsoft Health.

Apps created using the SDK can be marketed through the Windows, Android, or iOS app stores (The Band can sync Android and Apple phones, not just Windows phones). The apps will be subject to the standard review processes used by the respective app stores, Microsoft says.

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